Tag Archives: children

Never Send an Angel – Updated!

I’m thrilled to announce the re-release of my supernatural short, Never Send an Angel.

Updated content, an exciting new cover, and a sneak peek at my upcoming Young Adult Adventure, Eyes of the Hunter.

 

Never send an angel to do a mother’s job.

When someone threatens her child’s safety, this mother will call down the powers of Light and step into the Shadow to make a child killer pay.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library: FREE Books for Children Under 5

Featured Post

Did you know that Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library sends age appropriate books to children every month for free?!?!?!

Your child is between the ages of newborn – 5 and lives in the US, Canada, UK, or Australia, they may be eligible for the program. To check eligibility or register your child(ren), visit THIS PAGE.

 

“Rules for Dating My Daughter” Memes …

Someone recently told me that this is the Year of the Offense. Everyone seems to be offended by every little thing going on around them, which is of course amplified by the media highlighting the most ridiculous and inane things to stir the pot. This includes some bloggers. So, guess what the big offender is now?  Well, the title should give you a clue, but you can humour me by making a few wrong guesses …

Okay, okay.  It’s those “dating my daughter” memes like this one:

dating-my-daughter-funny

For some idiotic reason, folks are missing the point that these memes are jokes; exaggerated caricatures of fathers wanting to protect inexperienced teenage girls who are (generally speaking) wrapped up in romantic ideals and fairy-tale notions.

In fact, one daddy blogger stated that these demeaning memes show that men don’t trust their daughters, have no confidence in them, and think their daughters are “weak and feeble creatures” (that’s a direct quote).  From his comments about over-bearing fathers bullying, intimidating future friends and dates, and his obnoxious choice to post this topic under the category of “bad parenting”, it’s obvious that he’s confused the satirical portrayal of fathers in movies and television with real life. As the rest of us know; very few people actually behave the way these memes portray. That my father greeted a young man at the door with a shot gun in hand was just poor timing and reinforcement that you should always call ahead before showing up at someone’s house (… that’s also an attempt at humour.)

For that daddy blogger and any others who struggle with this topic, here are some points to consider:

jmok1

 

1) When Dad screened potential dates, met them at the door, spoke to them on the phone, and/or “put the fear of God” in them, I never felt like he didn’t trust me. Know why? Because, *MY* behaviour wasn’t what he was worried about.

Dad trusted me to do the right thing, and then he empowered me to be able to make good choices by teaching me what to say, what options I had in certain situations, and if all else failed, where to strike if I needed to. He did that so I would never feel or be defenseless just because I was on my own.

Nor did I feel “owned” or like property by the fact that his primal instincts were to protect his offspring. I find the above mentioned daddy blogger’s suggestion of that ridiculous and, dare I say – offensive.

 

delicate

 

2) At no time did Dad’s (over)protective behaviour give the impression or make me feel like I was a helpless little thing that would collapse in a fit of vapours in a crunch. Instead, I feel important, precious, and worth protecting.  I also felt confident that Dad had my back if things ever went sideways. He taught me that family takes care of each other; I could count on him to step up if I got into a situation I couldn’t handle on my own as an inexperienced teenager.

 

Cartoon by Mark Parisi
Cartoon by Mark Parisi

 

3) My old-world Italian father was pretty blunt about men and dating, but he didn’t teach me to “fear” men by being (over)protective. You know who did?  Men (and boys) who didn’t respect me; mentally, emotionally, or physically. Those assholes really drove home everything Dad was trying to tell me about why he was so worried  and why he felt the need to teach me how to slam a fist into a man’s throat.

 

You know why fathers do and say these things? It’s not that they don’t trust their daughters or think they’re “weak and feeble creatures”.

 

 

Fathers act in a way to protect their daughters in dating situations, because they’re men and they’ve “been there”

 

To paraphrase Dad:

Not all parents raise their kids to know and do what’s right. Even those kids who are raised properly make mistakes. It’s a parent’s job to make sure everyone is on the same page – that there’s a mutual understanding and respect.  And, if there’s a lapse in respect, there is a knowledge that there will be consequences – obviously not Liam Neeson style, but real solid consequences to their actions.

Despite the “caveman instinct” to protect our young, these memes, and the “tough-guy” mentality that some people are sneering at, isn’t about feminism, sexism, lack of trust in our children, or “bad parenting”. It’s about teaching our daughters (and their potential suitors) that “Even when you’re by yourself, you’re never on your own.”

 


 

Is it Secured? Is it Safe? (Guns in the Home With Kids)

I came across an article titled, “Want to Schedule a Playdate? Let’s Talk About Gun Safety First.” As the title suggests, it’s about knowing how other parents deal with having guns in their home before allowing your kids to go over to visit.

Photo: Norm Bosworth
Photo: Norm Bosworth

I grew up in Northern Ontario (Canada). A lot of homes have hunting weapons and we never thought anything of it.  Our parents certainly never asked, “Do you have guns?  Are they locked up?” But, maybe they should have.  There weren’t any laws back then to make sure weapons were secured from little hands that may want to explore.

We lost a few school friends to gun accidents throughout the years, even ones that were taught gun safety. The grief and horror on the face of the “safety trained” kid who accidentally shot his best friend … it never left him.

My dad always kept his guns unloaded and hanging high up on the wall out of reach. He taught my brother and I at an early age that guns are weapons and weapons kill. It doesn’t matter if you’re an animal or a child, if a weapon is pointed at you, it can and will kill you. On purpose or by accident – dead is dead.  We’d seen enough dead animals to know we didn’t want that to happen to us or anyone we cared about.

We were allowed to handle Dad’s hunting weapons only when we were in a safe location and only when he was standing there with his hands on us and/or the weapon. We knew what it felt like to hold them, aim them, and fire them. We knew how easy it was for a gun or rifle to go off when we didn’t mean for it to and how easy it was to hit something we didn’t mean to. Seeing Dad treat every weapon (knives included) with respect went a long way. He was never casual with them:

 

“The moment you don’t respect a weapon, it will kill you.
Always treat it like it’s loaded and ready to kill.”

 

Neither my brother or I ever had an urge to touch/play with them or show them off to friends. In fact, we had friends ask us to take down a rifle or shotgun so they could see them. The answer was always no. On purpose or by accident – dead is dead.

Now, it’s law here that firearms must be unloaded and made inoperable with a secure locking device or securely locked in a container/cabinet that can’t easily be broken into. Plus, ammo must be stored separately or locked in the same container as the firearm.

Even though it’s required by law where I live, the playdate article makes a good point. We can’t assume that everyone actually follows the law. There’s always someone who figures it’s nobody’s business what they do in their own home and “What the law doesn’t know, won’t hurt me.”  And, for other places that don’t have these types of legal requirements, a conversation about guns between parents becomes more important.

It’s okay to talk about things that affect the safety of our children. If you have guns in your home, you can be the one to start the conversation with the parents of your child(ren)’s friends.  Tell them what steps you take to keep your guns secure and children safe in your home. Let them know it’s okay to ask questions. Keep the conversation light, yet respectful. You never know who’s life this simple, open discussion could save.

~*~

If you would like to know how to make your firearms safe in the home,
visit Project Child Safe.

For those in the USA, CLICK HERE to get a
>> FREE << Safety Kit, which includes
a cable-style gun lock and safety instructions.